Social work books – recommended reading list

as experienced social workers and practice educators, we’ve been asked by a number of student social workers to compile a list of recommended social work books.

Resource E-Pack for Adult Practitioners | Social Care Resources

This Resource E-Pack has been developed for Adult Practitioners and showcases an excellent list of free direct resources that can be used when working with vulnerable adults. 

Visit our direct resources, guides & assessment handouts centre

Over 400 direct resources you can download .

How digital technology can transform social care – TEC

[vc_row bg_type=”” dima_canvas_style=”” translate_x=”0″ dima_z_index=”0″ delay=”” animate_item=”” delay_duration=”” delay_offset=””][vc_column bg_type=”” dima_canvas_style=”” min_height=”” translate_x=”0″ dima_z_index=”0″ delay=”” delay_duration=”” delay_offset=””][text delay=”” delay_duration=”” delay_offset=”” id=”” class=””]Technology Enabled Care (TEC) – What is it? Connected health, also known as technology enabled care (TEC), involves the convergence of health technology digital media and mobile devices. What does it do, you ask? It enables patients, carers and healthcare professionals (HCP’s) to access data and information more easily and improves the quality and outcomes of both health and social care.

TEC is not simply about the technology, it’s about putting people first. To do TEC right, it’s about joining up services around the individual – using data from various sources which provide real-time monitoring and communication, in relation to mental health as well as physical health. When people are living alone with long-term conditions or health challenges, TEC can keep them in contact with practitioners, monitoring services and carers in the form of digital media and mobile devices.

As you know, opportunities for using mobile technology have improved vastly over the last few years with the growing population of smartphone and tablet users in the UK, even among older age groups. Other notable developments are the availability of healthcare ‘bio sensing’ wearables, such as digital blood pressure monitors and glucose sensors and patient and provider access to real time healthcare data and information. Mobile technology can empower patients and carers by giving them more control over their health and making them less dependent on HCP’s for health information.

Just as you guessed, there are always going to be challenges arising. Overcoming staff reluctance to engage with technology is a tough one – HCP’s are often reluctant to engage with technology, partly due to the scale and pace of development and the proliferation and speed of development. As you can imagine, staff find it difficult with keeping up with the constant development and changes of technology. There are also concerns about quality, reliability; data, privacy and security- which will be discussed further in future blog posts!

Technology has the power to improve access to healthcare services, especially those with mobility problems.  Moving forward, technology will extend to more wearable, voice-controlled and implanted devices – we need to be ready for widespread availability of sensors and how we can make use of them without ethical or security worries. Health and care professionals also need a wide understanding of what is available and how it can be personalised.

We can come to the conclusion that;

  1. The digital shift is inevitable, a plan of action is needed to minimise disruption.
  2. The great opportunities of digital health care cannot be missed.
  3. Care services must keep up with consumer expectations and emerging technologies.
  4. Collaboration and alignment are vital
  5. Costs will be significant, but the investment is worth making.

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Sponsor:

[/custom_heading][image img_size=”medium” float=”center” caption=”” lightbox=”” target=”blank” width=”” delay=”” delay_duration=”” delay_offset=”” is_gallert_item=”” src=”6154″ alt=”” href=”https://logmycare.co.uk/” title=”” popup_content=”” id=”” class=”” style=”” tutorials=””][custom_heading delay=”” delay_duration=”” delay_offset=”” id=”” class=”” style=”” tutorials=””]

Who are we?

[/custom_heading][text delay=”” delay_duration=”” delay_offset=”” id=”” class=””]Log my Care are a UK based care management system provider focused on providing an easy and cost-effective way for residential care homes to move towards electronic care planning. We are proud to say that our newest system is ‘by carers, for carers’ and has been specifically designed to overcome the challenging amounts of admin and paperwork involved in day to day residential care.

We do this in two ways. The first is a smartphone app, in which carers can use to record at the point of care. This shows their daily to-do list, so they can keep on track of what to do and when. It also lets carers add a second signature for two-person activities and helps improve care by letting carers know if any of their tasks are overdue. The second part is ‘The Care Office’. This is a web portal created to give Managers and Owners the simplest way of organising the delivery of care across the whole home. It not only helps to set care standards, but it also provides an audit-trail and reduces repetitive admin tasks, freeing up time for more important activities.

We were inspired to create Log my Care following research into the challenges facing front-line carers every day. Log my Care is designed to empower carers, with user friendly hardware helping them to deliver better care.

Log my Care’s main features are free to use for all UK care homes. This, along with advantages such as the 2-factor authentication, mean that care homes don’t need to spend large amounts on hardware and can simply use a smartphone, saving costs from the get-go.[/text][callout type=”style_one” delay=”” delay_duration=”” delay_offset=”” title=”Featured Resources” message=”Download these fantastic free resources for social care practitioners.” title_color=”” text_color=”” bg_image=”” href=”” id=”” class=”” style=”” tutorials=””][button text=”Social Care Jargon Buster | Think Local Act Personal ” type=”” color_class=”” float=”start” target=”blank” lightbox=”” delay=”” delay_duration=”” delay_offset=”” href=”https://www.onestopsocial.co.uk//social-work-social-care-resources/resources-card/?dID=857″ title=”” popup_content=”” id=”” class=”” style=”” tutorials=””][clear by=”10px” id=”” class=””][button text=”Guide for line managers: Wellness Action Plans (WAPs) | Supporting Staff” type=”” color_class=”” float=”start” target=”blank” lightbox=”” delay=”” delay_duration=”” delay_offset=”” href=”https://www.onestopsocial.co.uk//social-work-social-care-resources/resources-card/?dID=5384″ title=”” popup_content=”” id=”” class=”” style=”” tutorials=””][/callout][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row bg_type=”” dima_canvas_style=”” translate_x=”0″ dima_z_index=”0″ delay=”” animate_item=”” delay_duration=”” delay_offset=””][vc_column bg_type=”” dima_canvas_style=”” min_height=”” translate_x=”0″ dima_z_index=”0″ delay=”” delay_duration=”” delay_offset=””][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row bg_type=”” dima_canvas_style=”” translate_x=”0″ dima_z_index=”0″ delay=”” animate_item=”” delay_duration=”” delay_offset=””][vc_column bg_type=”” dima_canvas_style=”” min_height=”” translate_x=”0″ dima_z_index=”0″ delay=”” delay_duration=”” delay_offset=””][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row bg_type=”” dima_canvas_style=”” translate_x=”0″ dima_z_index=”0″ delay=”” animate_item=”” delay_duration=”” delay_offset=””][vc_column bg_type=”” dima_canvas_style=”” min_height=”” translate_x=”0″ dima_z_index=”0″ delay=”” delay_duration=”” delay_offset=””][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row bg_type=”” dima_canvas_style=”” translate_x=”0″ dima_z_index=”0″ delay=”” animate_item=”” delay_duration=”” delay_offset=”” css=”.vc_custom_1561376691968{background-color: #ffffff !important;border: 3px initial !important;}”][vc_column bg_type=”” dima_canvas_style=”” min_height=”” translate_x=”0″ dima_z_index=”0″ delay=”” delay_duration=”” delay_offset=””][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row bg_type=”” dima_canvas_style=”” translate_x=”0″ dima_z_index=”0″ delay=”” animate_item=”” delay_duration=”” delay_offset=”” css=”.vc_custom_1561376486342{background-color: #848685 !important;border: 3px initial !important;}”][vc_column bg_type=”” dima_canvas_style=”” min_height=”” translate_x=”0″ dima_z_index=”0″ delay=”” delay_duration=”” delay_offset=””][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Active Listening Skills and Person Centred Approach in Social Work

Social workers practice not only in the traditional social care services (both Adults & Children & Young People), but also in schools; the military; third sector, voluntary services and local government agencies and legislative bodies. In fact, social workers can be found anywhere and everywhere there are people who need the help or assistance in addressing personal or social problems.

A ‘shared journey’; based on a positive working relationship

Social work practice seeks to help those assessed as in need to improve their situation through assessment, planning, intervention and supervision. However, effective delivery of support and services can only be done after the social worker manages to engage the individual (and family) and build a rapport with him or her as a ‘shared journey’; based on a positive working relationship (look at Systemic Practice).

As such in the ‘beginning process’, it is vital for the social worker to engage and secure an individual’s trust to bring the helping relationship to a greater height. But how can this be achieved and what do we need to demonstrated in practice?

Social work engagement skills

Two areas that social workers must be competent and demonstrate in practice on a day to day basis includes the ability to promote active listening skills and adopt a person centred approach (this includes when working in Child Protection or Safeguarding).

Below we have broken down these social work ‘buzz words’ and have offered guidance on how they can be adopted and promoted in front-line practice. We’ve also provided an excellent resource on ‘Social Work Engagement Skills’ that practitioners can download for free.

Active listening

Active listening is a communication technique that is used in social work, counselling, training and conflict resolution. It is a great (and essential) technique to promote empowerment and engagement. This document offers a good guide to help develop and understand active listening.

Person Centred Approach

The ‘person-centred’ approach was developed by Carl Rogers in the 1950s in the field of psychotherapy. It’s use emphasises the importance of creating a positive relationship and environment, focusing on:

  • Respect
  • Empathy
  • Genuineness (congruence)
  • Unconditional Positive Regard

Download resource

Top Tips: How To Be A Good Social Work Manager

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As practitioners, what qualities do you look out for and value in a manager? Below we’ve put a few ‘top tips’ that we hope will help assist managers in developing their skills and support for practitioners within the social work and care sectors.

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If a staff member has asked you for help on a certain task and/or your opinion, be honest. Sounds simple, right? But you’d be surprised at how many managers try to ‘wing it’ or misinform their staff. Honesty really is the best policy… so lets practice in line with the correct social work values and ethics we’ve been taught.

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The difference between being a good manager and an average one is that a good manager will be the first to admit that they don’t know everything. But, what they will do is help you find out the answer (as a shared journey). By being open about not being all knowing will break down barriers and show that you are human after all. This will help create a far better working relationship with your staff/practitioners.

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One of the most common themes when highlighting the difference between a boss and a leader is that the latter is not afraid to get down and dirty in completing work with staff. Whereas the former is more than happy to sit back and ‘bark’ orders (usually to hide their own incompetence) even when there are staff shortages… A good leader will not be afraid to do as well as say.

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As managers we can often become reliant on our most skilled and experienced practitioners to complete the majority of work. We often allocate and inundate them with the most complex cases and do this because we know that the work will get completed to a good standard. However, think about it, this isn’t good practice. In doing so, you are likely to increase staff burn due to them managing unworkable caseloads. It can also create feelings of resentment within a team, which can be toxic. So, make sure cases are evenly distributed between the teams. Yes, you may need to offer one practitioner more support, but this helps professional development and will strengthen the team and their practice.

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To manage effectively, it is wrong to assume that you can communicate with all staff at the same level or way. If staff are to fully process information, communication must be tailored to their own individual needs. Remember learning styles when working with service users/customers? Well, the same applies here… Some learn best by doing and others by watching or following. As managers, you need to adapt to these variants and engage with your staff differently.

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All too often managers only comment on staff work if it’s not of the expected level or standard. This can create an atmosphere of hostility and one that will be counter-productive. Whilst it sounds a bit cheesy, positivity really does breed positivity. So, the next time a practitioner does something well, tell them… It doesn’t hurt.

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Sometimes it’s difficult as managers not to feel the stress of the job. Whilst this will always (to some extent) be a part of our role, it’s essential that your anxieties are not passed onto your practitioners. Yeah, we want to promote professional autonomy, but we need to do this in a supportive and ‘save’ environment. If we don’t safeguard staff from manager anxiety, this will increase the likelihood of panicked decision making; which will fall under defensive rather than defensible practice.

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Related article:

[/vc_column_text][vc_custom_heading text=”How To Be A Social Work Manager Practitioners Value” font_container=”tag:h2|text_align:center|color:%23ef7e21″ use_theme_fonts=”yes” link=”url:https%3A%2F%2Fwww.onestopsocial.co.uk%2Fsocial-work-manager-value%2F||target:%20_blank|rel:nofollow”][vc_empty_space][vc_separator color=”custom” accent_color=”#ef7e21″][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Free Resource Packs on Self Harm, Forced Marriage, Trafficking & FGM

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”Self-harm Awareness Resource Pack” font_container=”tag:h2|text_align:left|color:%23ef7e21″ use_theme_fonts=”yes”][vc_column_text]Virtual College have completed these free resource packs on self harm in young people, forced marriage & FGM. Download copies for free now.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]To help parents & practitioners to understand the scale of self-harm and raise awareness of the issue, we have created a free resource pack.

The Resource Pack includes:

  • A poster
  • An infographic
  • An email footer
  • Images to share on social media
  • A website banner

[/vc_column_text][vc_btn title=”Download Self-harm Awareness Resource Pack” style=”outline-custom” outline_custom_color=”#ef7e21″ outline_custom_hover_background=”#666666″ outline_custom_hover_text=”#ffffff” shape=”round” align=”center” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.onestopsocial.co.uk%2Fsocial-work-social-care-resources%2Fresources-card%2F%3FdID%3D1310%26title%3DSelf-harm%2520awareness%2520resource%2520pack%2520%7C%2520Understanding%2520Young%2520Minds|||rel:nofollow”][vc_custom_heading text=”Human Trafficking Resource Pack” font_container=”tag:h2|text_align:left|color:%23ef7e21″ use_theme_fonts=”yes”][vc_column_text]An estimated 36 million people are being used, bought, sold or transported for exploitation worldwide, yet awareness of the issue remains low. Download this resource pack by filling out the form below to help raise awareness across your organisation.

This resource pack contains:

  • A poster for your staff
  • A flowchart of actions to take should you suspect trafficking
  • Modern Slavery Act 2015 legislation

[/vc_column_text][vc_btn title=”Download Human Trafficking Resource Pack” style=”outline-custom” outline_custom_color=”#ef7e21″ outline_custom_hover_background=”#666666″ outline_custom_hover_text=”#ffffff” shape=”round” align=”center” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.onestopsocial.co.uk%2Fsocial-work-social-care-resources%2Fresources-card%2F%3FdID%3D1311%26title%3DHuman%2520Trafficking%2520Resource%2520Pack||target:%20_blank|rel:nofollow”][vc_custom_heading text=”Recognising and Preventing FGM Resource Pack” font_container=”tag:h2|text_align:left|color:%23ef7e21″ use_theme_fonts=”yes”][vc_column_text]A recent study revealed that 137,000 women in England and Wales are estimated to be living with the consequences of FGM. We worked with the Home Office to combat this by creating a resource pack which aims to increase awareness of the issue.

To help you raise awareness of FGM, this pack includes:

  • A poster for your staff
  • An email to send to your colleagues
  • A banner to put in your email signature

[/vc_column_text][vc_btn title=”Download Recognising and Preventing FGM Resource Pack” style=”outline-custom” outline_custom_color=”#ef7e21″ outline_custom_hover_background=”#666666″ outline_custom_hover_text=”#ffffff” shape=”round” align=”center” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.onestopsocial.co.uk%2Fsocial-work-social-care-resources%2Fresources-card%2F%3FdID%3D1312%26title%3DRecognising%2520and%2520Preventing%2520FGM%2520Resource%2520Pack||target:%20_blank|rel:nofollow”][vc_custom_heading text=”Awareness of Forced Marriage Resource Pack” font_container=”tag:h2|text_align:left|color:%23ef7e21″ use_theme_fonts=”yes”][vc_column_text]Help in the fight against forced marriage by downloading this resource pack and raise awareness across your organisation.

This free resource pack contains:

  • A poster for your staff
  • A footer for your email
  • A facts and figures infographic
  • A guide to Forced Marriage legislation

[/vc_column_text][vc_btn title=”Download Awareness of Forced Marriage Resource Pack” style=”outline-custom” outline_custom_color=”#ef7e21″ outline_custom_hover_background=”#666666″ outline_custom_hover_text=”#ffffff” shape=”round” align=”center” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.onestopsocial.co.uk%2Fsocial-work-social-care-resources%2Fresources-card%2F%3FdID%3D1313%26title%3DAwareness%2520of%2520Forced%2520Marriage%2520Resource%2520Pack||target:%20_blank|rel:nofollow”][vc_column_text]Virtual College also run a number of free online courses. Follow the link below for further information.[/vc_column_text][vc_btn title=”Free Online Courses” style=”outline-custom” outline_custom_color=”#666666″ outline_custom_hover_background=”#666666″ outline_custom_hover_text=”#ffffff” shape=”round” align=”center” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.onestopsocial.co.uk%2Fvirtual-college-free-online-courses-social-workers-care-staff%2F||target:%20_blank|rel:nofollow”][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Add your front-line service to our Social Care Directory for free!

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We are continuing to expand our social care directory database on a National level and we’re inviting all front-line social care service providers to join us. Whether 3rd sector, charity, voluntary, private or local council services, our social care directory is completely FREE to register and list.

All you need to do is register for a free ‘advertiser’ account via our sign-in/register page. Once your email has been validated, you’ll be able to list any service you offer under the ‘social care directory’ listing package. It takes five minutes and it’s a great cost effective way to help promote the fantastic services you offer.

[/vc_column_text][vc_btn title=”Set up listing” style=”outline-custom” outline_custom_color=”#ef7e21″ outline_custom_hover_background=”#ef7e21″ outline_custom_hover_text=”#ffffff” shape=”round” align=”center” link=”url:https%3A%2F%2Fwww.onestopsocial.co.uk%2Fmy-account%2Fregister%2F||target:%20_blank|rel:nofollow”][vc_custom_heading text=”How it began” font_container=”tag:h2|text_align:left|color:%23ef7e21″ use_theme_fonts=”yes”][vc_column_text]

One Stop Social was created by Matt Hughes when he was managing a local Children’s Team. What he found was that front-line services and social care practitioners needed a better way to help improve referrals and communications, so that the right services could be found to help those in need of them. He understood that time is precious due to work pressures. As such, One Stop Social’s aims isto be a single point of access or ‘one stop shop’ where practitioners can search, find and refer to local social care services.

[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image=”4646″ img_size=”large” alignment=”center” onclick=”custom_link” img_link_target=”_blank” link=”https://www.onestopsocial.co.uk/social-work-membership/”][vc_btn title=”Set up listing” style=”outline-custom” outline_custom_color=”#ef7e21″ outline_custom_hover_background=”#ef7e21″ outline_custom_hover_text=”#ffffff” shape=”round” align=”center” link=”url:https%3A%2F%2Fwww.onestopsocial.co.uk%2Fmy-account%2Fregister%2F||target:%20_blank|rel:nofollow”][vc_custom_heading text=”Our Philosophy” font_container=”tag:h2|text_align:left|color:%23ef7e21″ use_theme_fonts=”yes”][vc_column_text]

For 3 years, we’ve been supporting the lives of thousands of UK social workers by assisting with interview skills, practice education, CPD sessions, legal training, access to relevant jobs and resources to build good practice. Our Work and Care Together events unite our community for innovative discussions and valuable training, continuing our mission to advocate good practice nationwide.

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Don’t Let Your Past Define Your Future: Care Leaver’s Story & Advice

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Paul is a young man who is confident and charming. He tells me, he lives life to the full and feels lucky to be where he is. Paul has his own business (hairstylist) and is surrounded by friends and family members who love and care for him dearly. Life seems good.

However, Paul says that life hasn’t always been good. There is a distinctive tattoo on his left wrist with the date 4th December 2000. Paul tells me that this was the day when he and his brother were removed from his mother’s care and placed into the care of his Aunty.

Early years.

 “Brother was hit with a hammer.”

Paul is very open and honest about his past childhood exposures. He tells me that since he can remember, his mother would often physically and emotionally abuse them, he would go to school in dirty clothes and was bullied because of it. Paul’s school attendance was sporadic, which included a number of moves and up to three years of non-attendance, all before he was 9 years old. Paul says that he would often be hit across the face by his mother and was always in fear of retribution. She had a sense of control over them both and would regularly threaten them so as they would not disclose any of the abusive incidents.

Paul tells me of a further incident whereby his brother was hit with a hammer. He tells me that such experiences were a regular occurrence at home and he is remarkably reflective in detail. I would hazard a guess that once witnessed, such events are not easy to forget. However, Paul does not resent his mother. He says that his mother had her own issues within life, such as learning difficulties and was later diagnosed with having a personality disorder.

It wasn’t until 4th December 2000 that things started to change for Paul. After a weekend away with his Aunty, Paul remembers returning home to get his things for school. However, after being home only a short while, he says that his mother had hit his brother over the head with a shower-head and pushed him down a flight of stairs. Following the incident, Paul remembers hearing his mother call his Aunty. She admitted that she could no longer cope or care for them and to ‘come and take them away’. Paul remembers running out of his mother’s home address with only a handful of pants and socks, and a pink hair dryer – Paul admits that this was perhaps an early sign of his eventual choice of career.

This prompted a referral to children social care. Paul never returned home.

Living with my Aunty – life in Care.

“The Pink Hairdryer was a positive omen.”

Paul speaks with his upmost respect and admiration for his Aunty, who stepped in during his time of need and that he will be forever thankful for her support. However, he admits that initially, it was difficult for him as he struggled to readjust to life. His behaviour deteriorated as all he wanted to do was to go back home. After all, he knew no different – this was his ‘norm’, he tells me. During this time, he would often break or smash items within his Aunty’s home, be disruptive and eventually turned to regular drug use. Paul admits that it was a very difficult and challenging time for him, which lasted for a period of three/four years.

However, slowly but surely things started to change for the better. Through the continued support, love and attention from his Aunty and his support networks (including his Social Worker), things started to settle and Paul’s confidence increased considerably. His attendance at school increased as he began to value education, learning the importance in gaining qualifications so as to achieve future employment aspirations. He stopped misusing drugs.

After a short spell on a plumbing course, where he achieved NVQ L2, Paul decided to move abroad for work. This lasted for a few years and is another example of his increased confidence and self-worth. He eventually returned home to complete a qualification in Hairdressing, a profession which he both loves and feels passionate about. Paul says the Pink Hairdryer was a positive omen.

Having met Paul, and now knowing his background, you could be forgiven for not knowing what he had witnessed as a child. This is further testament to his character and resilience and the support he has received over the years.

My amazing Social Worker – Alex.

“Alex went above and beyond”

After going into care, Paul was allocated a Social Worker called Alex. Like most Social Workers, Alex went above and beyond to support him. Paul speaks very highly of Alex, admitting that he could not fault her. Paul said that she helped support him and his brother at their time in need. He always felt listened too, was central to her decision making and believed she wanted the best for him. Whenever he needed advice, support or just someone to talk to, Alex was there. He felt like her only case – she was there when they did good things and not just when things didn’t go so well.

Paul is still in touch with Alex today.

Paul’s advice and guidance.

What advice would you give to anyone that is going through or has been through the Care System?  

“Don’t let you past define your future. Life is a journey and you are the master of your destiny. Yes, you will need help along the way, but the great thing about the future is that it’s not happened yet. Also, surround yourself with a positive support network. For me this was my Aunty. My brother and I were lucky to have such great support. My Aunty taught me right from wrong and I have a very special relationship with her now.”

What advice would you give Social Workers? 

“It’s all about the Child – please, never lose sight of this! My Social Worker was amazing and that’s because she was all about my brother and I. We felt central to what was going on around us. Also, make those that are in the care system, feel like they’re not in care and talk at a level so as it can be understood by them.”

What advice would you give to any Foster Carers?

“It’s not about the money. Foster Care is a difficult job and, yes, you should receive payment for it. But remember the best foster carers are those that go above and beyond to help others at their time in need. Also, you need to have patience. It won’t happen overnight and often there will be challenges and difficulties along the way. You need to be their rock!”

What would be you message to anyone reading this?

“Everyone is on a journey in this life. Some bad paths and some good paths, but it’s your choice which path you take. Things can get hard and things can be amazing but that’s life – it’s all about the ups and downs and how you deal with them. In other words, don’t let your past define your future. I wouldn’t be where I am today if it wasn’t for the support I received especially from my Aunty.”

We would like to thank Paul for his time in meeting with us here at One Stop Social. It was a hugely humbling experience and one that we shall never forget. There are many positive stories like this that start with some bad life experiences. Paul is a fantastic example of how you can achieve happiness through strong will and a loving and supportive network.

If you have a story you would like to share with us, please feel free to get in touch with us.

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Free downloadable direct resources, assessment and guidance handouts.

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Children Social Work Resources, Assessment & Guides | Practitioner Support


We have put together a list of free to download children social work resources, assessment handouts and guides for practitioners. It has been created to help support practitioners engage with children and young people accessing services and support.

From assessment to intervention delivery below is a list that offers guidance and workable resources to use when gathering information, assessing or working with those assessed or requiring support as in need, welfare or safeguarding/protection.

Free Practice Guides

Recommended Books & Resouces

Student Social Worker Guides, Resources & Recommended Books

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]So, September is just around the corner and for many it will mean the start of your social work career/placement.  

To help all student social workers and ASYE’s, we have put together this page which has a list of our most viewed and downloaded resources and student practitioner support guides. We have also put together a selection of recommended books.

It is free to download and is an excellent ‘starter pack’ for any Student Social Worker. Our advice is to download and save (or print) and keep an individual pack that you can keep adding to. We will continue to add to the list, so make sure you’ve signed up to our E-Bulletin.

We wish you all the best of luck in your studies and social work career! [/vc_column_text][vc_cta h2=”Social Work Guides” txt_align=”center”]

How to make the most of your Student Social Work Placement

Student Placement Top Tips: How to treat your Student Professional

Student Social Work: What makes a good observation?

How to Evidence PCF | Positive Social Work: The Essential Toolkit for NQSWs

Critical Reflection Writing

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Ecomap Template | How to do an ecomap

Genogram Template | How to do a genogram

What’s Your Learning Style?

Social Work: Theories to Inform & Intervene & Models of Assessment

Reflective Log Template | Student Social Workers

Professional Capabilities Framework Evidence Sheet | Student Social Workers

Professional Capabilities Framework Evidence Sheet: End of Second Placement

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Share A New Model for Social Work

The Social Work Portfolio: A Students Guide To Evidencing Your Practice

Evidencing CPD: A Guide to Building your Social Work Portfolio

Report Writing

Practising Critical Reflection: A Resource Handbook

An Introduction To Social Work Practice

Writing Analytical Assessments in Social Work

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