Social work books – recommended reading list

as experienced social workers and practice educators, we’ve been asked by a number of student social workers to compile a list of recommended social work books.

Resource E-Pack for Adult Practitioners | Social Care Resources

This Resource E-Pack has been developed for Adult Practitioners and showcases an excellent list of free direct resources that can be used when working with vulnerable adults. 

Visit our direct resources, guides & assessment handouts centre

Over 400 direct resources you can download .

Social Work Application Forms | What you need to know

[vc_row bg_type=”” dima_canvas_style=”” translate_x=”0″ dima_z_index=”0″ delay=”” animate_item=”” delay_duration=”” delay_offset=””][vc_column bg_type=”” dima_canvas_style=”” min_height=”” translate_x=”0″ dima_z_index=”0″ delay=”” delay_duration=”” delay_offset=””][text delay=”” delay_duration=”” delay_offset=”” id=”” class=””]When completing application forms, how do you feel about them? For most, it can be an anxious and somewhat daunting experience, which often includes a combination of dread and boredom. However, what do you need to know in order to make it through? Well, below we have offered some excellent pointers and examples to help demystify the experience!

Make it easy for the short-Lister

Notice what the organisation or service is asking for within the essential and desirable job description. You will often have clues that you can use, such as using the headings:

  • Relevant experience
  • Achievements
  • Relevant competencies from the person specification
  • Essential experiences
  • Skills

Analyse the person specification and BE CLEAR

“Go through the job and worker descriptions and extract the key criteria they are looking for. When filling in the application form, place each criterion as a heading and use examples from practice to demonstrate how you have met those criteria. It may seem simplistic but if you are explicit that you are suitable for the job role, then an interview is guaranteed.” Source: Guardian.

General Competency questions in Application Forms 

  • Describe a situation when you lead a team/worked in a team
  • Give an example of a time when you dealt with confrontation
  • Describe a situation when you influenced or motivated others
  • Describe a situation when you used initiative
  • Give an example of when you solved a problem
  • Give an example of how you have applied knowledge of legislation in a social work setting.
  • How you would you seek to promote independence for service users
  • Give an example of a time when you acted in an anti-oppressive way.
  • What factors do you consider when making an assessment?
  • What factors do you consider when assessing risk?

If you are completing several application forms at once, as is often the case, you can use the above headings to create a ‘bulk answer’ crib sheet. This will help you evidence your work consistently whilst also reducing chances of you becoming complacent.

Use the STAR approach to help evidence examples

  • S – SITUATION – When, where, with whom (contextualise)
  • T – TASK – Describe the situation or task you want to offer as evidence
  • A – ACTION – What did you do? What was your contribution?  How did you make things happen?
  • R – RESULT – What was the result/outcome? (preferably positive) What did you learn?

Using the above formula will assist in offering structure to your answers, whilst also keeping them SMART – Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic & Timely. Be concise and to the point. Have a go: Pick a question and share a STAR example

Personal Statement strategies

Completing the personal statements/specifications section is by far the most difficult task to undertake in any application form. As such, develop strategies to help guide you through this processes. For example:

  • First sentence -make a short STATEMENT summarising how you meet the individual specification from job details.
  • Then provide an EXAMPLE of the claim you have just made.
  • Final sentence – show REFLECTION on the above – what you realise.

Example – Specification requirement – about commitment to promoting Equal Opportunities:

‘I have always tried to ensure in my personal and work life that I am sensitive to and inclusive of the cultures and circumstances of other people. In 2006, I worked as a mentor/facilitator to a group of students on the Aim Higher project to encourage pupils from non-traditional backgrounds to consider university. I designed projects and activities that recognised and focused on the diverse experience within the group to ensure participation. The programme was successful for the pupils and a rewarding learning experience for me. The experience showed me that working together with mutual respect is more productive and rewarding.’

We hope this has offered you with some useful guidance in relation to application form completion. Please feel free to download or save a copy of this. The above information has been used and delivered to Social Work Students, Social Workers and Return Social Workers as well as Care Professionals so as to help increase employment opportunities.[/text][callout type=”style_one” delay=”” delay_duration=”” delay_offset=”” title=”We have also completed the following guidance” message=”Further resources to help you land that perfect job” title_color=”” text_color=”” bg_image=”” href=”” id=”” class=”” style=””][button text=”10 Steps from Job Application to Job Interview” type=”” color_class=”” lightbox=”” delay=”” delay_duration=”” delay_offset=”” href=”https://www.onestopsocial.co.uk/10-steps-from-job-application-to-job-interview-one-stop-social/” title=”” popup_content=”” id=”” class=”” style=””][clear by=”10px” id=”” class=””][button text=”Social Work Interview Questions: What you need to know” type=”” color_class=”” lightbox=”” delay=”” delay_duration=”” delay_offset=”” href=”https://www.onestopsocial.co.uk/social-work-interview-questions-need-know/” title=”” popup_content=”” id=”” class=”” style=”” tutorials=””][/callout][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Top Tips: How To Be A Good Social Work Manager

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As practitioners, what qualities do you look out for and value in a manager? Below we’ve put a few ‘top tips’ that we hope will help assist managers in developing their skills and support for practitioners within the social work and care sectors.

[/vc_column_text][vc_custom_heading text=”Honesty” font_container=”tag:h2|text_align:left|color:%23ef7e21″ use_theme_fonts=”yes”][vc_column_text]

If a staff member has asked you for help on a certain task and/or your opinion, be honest. Sounds simple, right? But you’d be surprised at how many managers try to ‘wing it’ or misinform their staff. Honesty really is the best policy… so lets practice in line with the correct social work values and ethics we’ve been taught.

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The difference between being a good manager and an average one is that a good manager will be the first to admit that they don’t know everything. But, what they will do is help you find out the answer (as a shared journey). By being open about not being all knowing will break down barriers and show that you are human after all. This will help create a far better working relationship with your staff/practitioners.

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One of the most common themes when highlighting the difference between a boss and a leader is that the latter is not afraid to get down and dirty in completing work with staff. Whereas the former is more than happy to sit back and ‘bark’ orders (usually to hide their own incompetence) even when there are staff shortages… A good leader will not be afraid to do as well as say.

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As managers we can often become reliant on our most skilled and experienced practitioners to complete the majority of work. We often allocate and inundate them with the most complex cases and do this because we know that the work will get completed to a good standard. However, think about it, this isn’t good practice. In doing so, you are likely to increase staff burn due to them managing unworkable caseloads. It can also create feelings of resentment within a team, which can be toxic. So, make sure cases are evenly distributed between the teams. Yes, you may need to offer one practitioner more support, but this helps professional development and will strengthen the team and their practice.

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To manage effectively, it is wrong to assume that you can communicate with all staff at the same level or way. If staff are to fully process information, communication must be tailored to their own individual needs. Remember learning styles when working with service users/customers? Well, the same applies here… Some learn best by doing and others by watching or following. As managers, you need to adapt to these variants and engage with your staff differently.

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All too often managers only comment on staff work if it’s not of the expected level or standard. This can create an atmosphere of hostility and one that will be counter-productive. Whilst it sounds a bit cheesy, positivity really does breed positivity. So, the next time a practitioner does something well, tell them… It doesn’t hurt.

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Sometimes it’s difficult as managers not to feel the stress of the job. Whilst this will always (to some extent) be a part of our role, it’s essential that your anxieties are not passed onto your practitioners. Yeah, we want to promote professional autonomy, but we need to do this in a supportive and ‘save’ environment. If we don’t safeguard staff from manager anxiety, this will increase the likelihood of panicked decision making; which will fall under defensive rather than defensible practice.

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Related article:

[/vc_column_text][vc_custom_heading text=”How To Be A Social Work Manager Practitioners Value” font_container=”tag:h2|text_align:center|color:%23ef7e21″ use_theme_fonts=”yes” link=”url:https%3A%2F%2Fwww.onestopsocial.co.uk%2Fsocial-work-manager-value%2F||target:%20_blank|rel:nofollow”][vc_empty_space][vc_separator color=”custom” accent_color=”#ef7e21″][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Free Resource Packs on Self Harm, Forced Marriage, Trafficking & FGM

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”Self-harm Awareness Resource Pack” font_container=”tag:h2|text_align:left|color:%23ef7e21″ use_theme_fonts=”yes”][vc_column_text]Virtual College have completed these free resource packs on self harm in young people, forced marriage & FGM. Download copies for free now.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]To help parents & practitioners to understand the scale of self-harm and raise awareness of the issue, we have created a free resource pack.

The Resource Pack includes:

  • A poster
  • An infographic
  • An email footer
  • Images to share on social media
  • A website banner

[/vc_column_text][vc_btn title=”Download Self-harm Awareness Resource Pack” style=”outline-custom” outline_custom_color=”#ef7e21″ outline_custom_hover_background=”#666666″ outline_custom_hover_text=”#ffffff” shape=”round” align=”center” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.onestopsocial.co.uk%2Fsocial-work-social-care-resources%2Fresources-card%2F%3FdID%3D1310%26title%3DSelf-harm%2520awareness%2520resource%2520pack%2520%7C%2520Understanding%2520Young%2520Minds|||rel:nofollow”][vc_custom_heading text=”Human Trafficking Resource Pack” font_container=”tag:h2|text_align:left|color:%23ef7e21″ use_theme_fonts=”yes”][vc_column_text]An estimated 36 million people are being used, bought, sold or transported for exploitation worldwide, yet awareness of the issue remains low. Download this resource pack by filling out the form below to help raise awareness across your organisation.

This resource pack contains:

  • A poster for your staff
  • A flowchart of actions to take should you suspect trafficking
  • Modern Slavery Act 2015 legislation

[/vc_column_text][vc_btn title=”Download Human Trafficking Resource Pack” style=”outline-custom” outline_custom_color=”#ef7e21″ outline_custom_hover_background=”#666666″ outline_custom_hover_text=”#ffffff” shape=”round” align=”center” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.onestopsocial.co.uk%2Fsocial-work-social-care-resources%2Fresources-card%2F%3FdID%3D1311%26title%3DHuman%2520Trafficking%2520Resource%2520Pack||target:%20_blank|rel:nofollow”][vc_custom_heading text=”Recognising and Preventing FGM Resource Pack” font_container=”tag:h2|text_align:left|color:%23ef7e21″ use_theme_fonts=”yes”][vc_column_text]A recent study revealed that 137,000 women in England and Wales are estimated to be living with the consequences of FGM. We worked with the Home Office to combat this by creating a resource pack which aims to increase awareness of the issue.

To help you raise awareness of FGM, this pack includes:

  • A poster for your staff
  • An email to send to your colleagues
  • A banner to put in your email signature

[/vc_column_text][vc_btn title=”Download Recognising and Preventing FGM Resource Pack” style=”outline-custom” outline_custom_color=”#ef7e21″ outline_custom_hover_background=”#666666″ outline_custom_hover_text=”#ffffff” shape=”round” align=”center” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.onestopsocial.co.uk%2Fsocial-work-social-care-resources%2Fresources-card%2F%3FdID%3D1312%26title%3DRecognising%2520and%2520Preventing%2520FGM%2520Resource%2520Pack||target:%20_blank|rel:nofollow”][vc_custom_heading text=”Awareness of Forced Marriage Resource Pack” font_container=”tag:h2|text_align:left|color:%23ef7e21″ use_theme_fonts=”yes”][vc_column_text]Help in the fight against forced marriage by downloading this resource pack and raise awareness across your organisation.

This free resource pack contains:

  • A poster for your staff
  • A footer for your email
  • A facts and figures infographic
  • A guide to Forced Marriage legislation

[/vc_column_text][vc_btn title=”Download Awareness of Forced Marriage Resource Pack” style=”outline-custom” outline_custom_color=”#ef7e21″ outline_custom_hover_background=”#666666″ outline_custom_hover_text=”#ffffff” shape=”round” align=”center” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.onestopsocial.co.uk%2Fsocial-work-social-care-resources%2Fresources-card%2F%3FdID%3D1313%26title%3DAwareness%2520of%2520Forced%2520Marriage%2520Resource%2520Pack||target:%20_blank|rel:nofollow”][vc_column_text]Virtual College also run a number of free online courses. Follow the link below for further information.[/vc_column_text][vc_btn title=”Free Online Courses” style=”outline-custom” outline_custom_color=”#666666″ outline_custom_hover_background=”#666666″ outline_custom_hover_text=”#ffffff” shape=”round” align=”center” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.onestopsocial.co.uk%2Fvirtual-college-free-online-courses-social-workers-care-staff%2F||target:%20_blank|rel:nofollow”][/vc_column][/vc_row]

NQSW explores relationships as the heart of social work

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”The past” font_container=”tag:h2|text_align:left|color:%23ef7e21″ use_theme_fonts=”yes”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]

Throughout my social work education, it was drummed into me the need to be a radical social worker. Fight for social justice they said, stand up to the establishment they said, this was the ONLY social worker to be. Now whilst I don’t mind challenging when necessary, here I was, a fresh faced, unqualified newbie who was now questioning how I was going to hold down a job, look after my family, attend rally’s and protests and generally cause a bit of trouble. Noooooo that couldn’t be right surely? I mean, I had sacrificed my entire social life, my sanity AND the pub to fulfil my career goals, surely there was a better way? .

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They say social work is a calling and I believe it is.  I have heard stories about social workers lying to people about their jobs, but not me.  Wear my badge with pride I do.  I can honestly say I love my job, I really do.  I had found that work life balance that most people fantasised about.  You see social work values really do fit in line with my own.  However, eighteen months qualified and I was beginning to feel unsatisfied.  I knew I was struggling to deal with a profession that was becoming besieged by targets and timescales.  It has been feeling like social work was being defined by everyone except social workers and we were losing our voice.

Then I was given information about an event looking at social pedagogy in Europe.  Having completed a module on it in university I was intrigued to find out more………and besides, who can refuse a free day out in Preston?

On the day of the event I spoke to many people from many countries, all talking about this value-based approach of relational working.  This was it, this was the “radical” social work I had been looking for.  A holistic way of working to support well-being, learning and growth. Putting relationships at the heart of social work!  Before I knew it, I had signed up to the MA in Social Pedagogy Leadership, and that “free” day out in Preston would result in more student debt!

[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image=”4646″ img_size=”large” alignment=”center” onclick=”custom_link” link=”https://www.onestopsocial.co.uk/social-work-membership/”][vc_single_image image=”4665″ img_size=”large” alignment=”center” onclick=”custom_link” link=”https://www.onestopsocial.co.uk/social-work-membership/”][vc_custom_heading text=”You’re studying what?” font_container=”tag:h2|text_align:left|color:%23ef7e21″ use_theme_fonts=”yes”][vc_column_text]

One of the first things I was introduced to was the term ‘Haltung’.  Roughly translated as ethos, mindset or attitude.  I was taught how Haltung guides our actions by what we believe in, and is characterised by core conditions of congruence, empathic understanding, and unconditional positive regard.  It was now that I realised why I had been struggling.  Yes, I love my job, but at a time when social work and austerity go hand in hand, I was finding it increasingly difficult to build relationships with the children and families I work alongside, and I was realising why that was.  Relationships are important to me both personal and professional – and these are naturally linked.  It was obvious there was a “tug of loyalty” between my Haltung and the needs of my organisation.

[/vc_column_text][vc_custom_heading text=”The three ‘P’s'” font_container=”tag:h2|text_align:left|color:%23ef7e21″ use_theme_fonts=”yes”][vc_column_text]

I was always told not to share any personal information when working with families.  I found this difficult as I felt like I was doing “to” families rather than doing “with”.  There I was with my laptop and ID badge oozing power, expecting families to divulge their deepest darkest secrets without sharing anything of myself.  I mean, as far as I am aware I am human too? I have my own challenges and experiences, and by sharing I could help reduce the imbalance of power and connect on a human level.  The relationship forms the foundation of my work and that could only succeed if I was authentic (3-ps).

Social work values and ethics tell us to be non-judgemental.  We were taught to be aware of our own beliefs and prejudices and how these can affect working relationships, but never to consider what the people we work with bring with them.  Very often we get “stuck” cases that become labelled as “troubled families”.

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Hermeneutics offered me an understanding of why people don’t come to any given conclusion without some form of pre-understanding, which is influenced by their own views and experiences.  “Understanding is, essentially, a historically effected event” (Gadamer, 2004). Basically, the inappropriately labelled “troubled families” bring with them their own views and experiences, and by realising how their reality is constructed by these experiences, effects how they engage and could make a person feel misunderstood.  Never had the saying “you can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make it drink” made more sense – change will not happen if it is imposed.  Essentially, I needed to understand that we can all look at the same thing differently and arrive at different conclusions.

When I initially read a case, I make assumptions about a family, its natural, I am only human.  However, hermeneutics explained how my prejudices can affect my interpretations of that family.  It made me look at people’s behaviour and challenge my own thinking, beliefs and perceptions, and consciously try and not label families.  It is important to me to understand the way of life of a person, therefore, I had to understand their thinking and behaviour.  By utilising empathy and dialogue will only lead me towards a greater commitment from families and develop positive relationships.

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I am used to the scrunched-up faces and look of confusion when I tell people what I am studying.  I try and explain that social pedagogy is not a method or something we can adopt for a particular situation, it is about how we do what we do.  As professionals I learn and act using my head (knowledge) heart (emotions) and hands (actions) – striving for the balance of all three.

*Gadamer, H, G. (2004) Truth and Method. London: Continuum.

Written by an anonymous NQSW Social Worker.

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_separator color=”orange”][vc_custom_heading text=”Related topic:
My Social Work Story Series: NQSW’s journey to Social Work” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left|color:%23848685″ use_theme_fonts=”yes” link=”url:https%3A%2F%2Fwww.onestopsocial.co.uk%2Fsocial-work-story%2F||target:%20_blank|”][vc_separator color=”orange”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=”.vc_custom_1553858897896{background-color: #848685 !important;}”][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”Want to know more about social pedagogy?” font_container=”tag:h2|text_align:left|color:%23ffffff” use_theme_fonts=”yes”][vc_btn title=”Thempra website has lots of information and resources” style=”outline-custom” outline_custom_color=”#ffffff” outline_custom_hover_background=”#ffffff” outline_custom_hover_text=”#ef7e21″ shape=”round” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.thempra.org.uk%2Fsocial-pedagogy%2F%20||target:%20_blank|”][vc_btn title=”Sign up to the FREE Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) to look at social pedagogy across Europe” style=”outline-custom” outline_custom_color=”#ffffff” outline_custom_hover_background=”#ffffff” outline_custom_hover_text=”#ef7e21″ shape=”round” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.thempra.org.uk%2Fmooc%2Fmooc-social-pedagogy-across-europe-launching-on-coursera%2F||target:%20_blank|”][vc_btn title=”MA in Social Pedagogy Leadership at University of Central Lancashire” style=”outline-custom” outline_custom_color=”#ffffff” outline_custom_hover_background=”#ffffff” outline_custom_hover_text=”#ef7e21″ shape=”round” link=”url:https%3A%2F%2Fwww.uclan.ac.uk%2Fcourses%2Fma-social-pedagogy-leadership.php||target:%20_blank|”][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Add your front-line service to our Social Care Directory for free!

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We are continuing to expand our social care directory database on a National level and we’re inviting all front-line social care service providers to join us. Whether 3rd sector, charity, voluntary, private or local council services, our social care directory is completely FREE to register and list.

All you need to do is register for a free ‘advertiser’ account via our sign-in/register page. Once your email has been validated, you’ll be able to list any service you offer under the ‘social care directory’ listing package. It takes five minutes and it’s a great cost effective way to help promote the fantastic services you offer.

[/vc_column_text][vc_btn title=”Set up listing” style=”outline-custom” outline_custom_color=”#ef7e21″ outline_custom_hover_background=”#ef7e21″ outline_custom_hover_text=”#ffffff” shape=”round” align=”center” link=”url:https%3A%2F%2Fwww.onestopsocial.co.uk%2Fmy-account%2Fregister%2F||target:%20_blank|rel:nofollow”][vc_custom_heading text=”How it began” font_container=”tag:h2|text_align:left|color:%23ef7e21″ use_theme_fonts=”yes”][vc_column_text]

One Stop Social was created by Matt Hughes when he was managing a local Children’s Team. What he found was that front-line services and social care practitioners needed a better way to help improve referrals and communications, so that the right services could be found to help those in need of them. He understood that time is precious due to work pressures. As such, One Stop Social’s aims isto be a single point of access or ‘one stop shop’ where practitioners can search, find and refer to local social care services.

[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image=”4646″ img_size=”large” alignment=”center” onclick=”custom_link” img_link_target=”_blank” link=”https://www.onestopsocial.co.uk/social-work-membership/”][vc_btn title=”Set up listing” style=”outline-custom” outline_custom_color=”#ef7e21″ outline_custom_hover_background=”#ef7e21″ outline_custom_hover_text=”#ffffff” shape=”round” align=”center” link=”url:https%3A%2F%2Fwww.onestopsocial.co.uk%2Fmy-account%2Fregister%2F||target:%20_blank|rel:nofollow”][vc_custom_heading text=”Our Philosophy” font_container=”tag:h2|text_align:left|color:%23ef7e21″ use_theme_fonts=”yes”][vc_column_text]

For 3 years, we’ve been supporting the lives of thousands of UK social workers by assisting with interview skills, practice education, CPD sessions, legal training, access to relevant jobs and resources to build good practice. Our Work and Care Together events unite our community for innovative discussions and valuable training, continuing our mission to advocate good practice nationwide.

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Youth Justice worksheets on attitudes & consequences of offending

Below we have compiled 9 youth justice worksheets that offer one to one or group based activities addressing the attitudes and subsequent consequences of offending/anti-social behaviour by children and young people. This is a good programme of work which starts from the basic understanding to more complex thinking.

Age Range: Tailored for Children & Young People.

Equipment Required: You can print the worksheets or transfer onto a flip chart (particularly useful for group based activities).

 

Think Victim | Victim Awareness Worksheets

Direct Resources

Search our direct resources directory for lots of free fantastic resources, guides and handouts for practitioners.

Children Social Work Resources, Assessment & Guides | Practitioner Support


We have put together a list of free to download children social work resources, assessment handouts and guides for practitioners. It has been created to help support practitioners engage with children and young people accessing services and support.

From assessment to intervention delivery below is a list that offers guidance and workable resources to use when gathering information, assessing or working with those assessed or requiring support as in need, welfare or safeguarding/protection.

Free Practice Guides

Recommended Books & Resouces

Attending Your First Fostering Panel: A Practical Guide

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Following successful completion of your Form F report and subsequent journey through quality assurance, the final hurdle approaches – presenting your findings at the fostering panel. The purpose of panel is to make clear recommendations to the agency as to whether, in its view, individual applicants should be approved/re-approved. Attending a fostering panel can be daunting, for both applicant and assessor, so you may find below useful points to bear in mind.

      • [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”Observe a Fostering Panel” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left|color:%23ef7e21″ use_theme_fonts=”yes”][vc_column_text]Gaining experience of how your organisation’s panel operates will give you a better understanding of what to expect when you are in attendance. Observing a panel will provide you with an opportunity to witness how the panel works, the methodology they use and what they deem to be a robust Form F assessment. You will also gain knowledge and insight into the group dynamics and functioning.

    [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”Research the panel members” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left|color:%23ef7e21″ use_theme_fonts=”yes”][vc_column_text]The panel will consist of numerous individuals, each with a differing area of expertise. Panel members will view your assessment from their own professional perspective and will likely identify and pose questions accordingly. Make it your business to know your panel.

    [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”Meet with the applicants prior to your panel appearance (pre-panel prep)” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left|color:%23ef7e21″ use_theme_fonts=”yes”][vc_column_text]It is important that applicants feel fully supported and guided throughout the assessment process and this includes preparation for panel. Perhaps think about going for a coffee together before your panel time slot (being mindful of confidentiality of course!). This will give you both an opportunity to revisit the panel process, explore potential panel questions, as well as discuss any updates that may have occurred since the Form F was submitted to the organisation.

    [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”Support the applicants during the panel” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left|color:%23ef7e21″ use_theme_fonts=”yes”][vc_column_text]Do not be afraid to speak up for the applicants whilst at panel. We can all get flustered at times and you may be well-positioned to prompt the applicants to expand on their answers or reframe their responses. However, be careful not to answer for them.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”Meet with the applicants after panel (post-panel debrief)” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left|color:%23ef7e21″ use_theme_fonts=”yes”][vc_column_text]The applicants will need an opportunity to process and reflect on their panel experience. It is important that you allow them time and space for this as it will provide an opportunity for learning. It also signifies the official ending to their assessment, and quite possibly, their involvement with you. Encourage them to be open and honest about their assessment experience, request feedback from the applicant and ensure you explain the next steps, whatever they may be.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”Learning from Practice” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left|color:%23ef7e21″ use_theme_fonts=”yes”][vc_column_text]Each panel differs in their expectations and what they consider standard practice. Try to remember any questions you are asked and/or critical comments that are made as it will help inform your practice and aid you in future assessment quality. As hard as it can be sometimes, try not to take constructive criticism personally, rather absorb it as part of your learning journey.  I never stop learning.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_custom_heading text=”Give yourself a pat on the back” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left|color:%23ef7e21″ use_theme_fonts=”yes”][vc_column_text]Successfully completing social work assessments and presenting them to an experienced panel requires a diverse and demanding range of professional, emotional, and cognitive skills in addition to continued commitment and dedication. Make sure you take time to acknowledge a job well done.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_btn title=”DOWNLOAD THIS PRACTICAL GUIDE” color=”warning” align=”center” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.onestopsocial.co.uk%2Fsocial-work-social-care-resources%2Fresources-card%2F%3FdID%3D312%26title%3DAttending%2520Your%2520First%2520Fostering%2520Panel%3A%2520A%2520Practical%2520Guide||target:%20_blank|rel:nofollow”][vc_btn title=”A Practical Guide To Completing Your First Form F Assessment: Useful Hints and Tips” color=”warning” align=”center” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.onestopsocial.co.uk%2Fa-practical-guide-to-completing-your-first-form-f-assessment-useful-hints-and-tips%2F%20||target:%20_blank|rel:nofollow”][vc_column_text]

    Author Bio

    Written by Stef Lewis for One Stop Social.  Independent Social Worker (MASW)  – Atarah Assessment and Consultancy.

    Stef Lewis is an experienced social worker, who has had the opportunity to work within numerous early intervention, adoption and fostering teams and is now a well-established independent social worker and fostering panel member. Stef blogs with One Stop Social because she wishes to share her own learning with others

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